Category: baby blues

Beauty in Small Things: My Birth of Daisy | Guest Writer Toni Gordon

Being pregnant was pretty great for me. I was lucky enough to not get morning sickness, I stopped working at 5 months, I went to yoga, ate ice-cream, watched Netflix, lazed in a hammock and snuggled with my pup. I was such a calm pregnant person. My husband who worked away was very caring and made sure that I was as comfortable as possible from afar. He’d send me flowers, and make sure that I had everything that I needed. My doctor ensured that I had to relax, as I was “high risk” with psoriatic arthritis. I was in a moderate amount of joint pain, from my hips and lower back, but I managed because hey… women have been doing it for centuries. I was really lucky. My obstetrician seemed to be very attentive, he told me “Don’t worry, I will be there through out your journey because you are high risk” As my husband did work away, and that I was high risk, we all decided on a date in which I would be induced.

(Mistake #1)

The day before my induction date, my husband flew home. I had my bags packed and we set off for the hospital. I was pretty excited to meet Daisy. Daisy was always going to be Daisy… it was a very strong lightning bolt that hit me in 2012 which was a whole year before she was even a sparkle in my eye. The day started like expected, the tried to ripen my cervix and the doctors and nurses wore my privates like an old glove. I think that was the point where I left my dignity at the door. Anyway, I was in the zone. I had no drugs, I have the song playlists, the calming lavender mist sprays, pillows, breath mints you name it, I had it I was prepared AF for the labour. I had watched every episode of born every minute and I knew there was no turning back. 8 hours passed and I was 4cm dilated.

They warned me that I may need to have a caesarian because of the risk of infection. I was fine with that, my OB would call in every 30 minutes and I was on the happy gas. I was fine. Then, the next call, the babies heart rate was dropping with every contraction, we are prepping you for surgery… I was cool, I was prepared for any which way they were going to give me Daisy as long as she was okay. They doctor care to give me the epidural. My mother and husband nearly fainted as 3 attempts to place the needle were too much to take. But that was fine. Finally after 10 hours I was getting prepped for surgery.

They took away the happy gas and as I entered the taxi rank my OB approached me and my husband… “Look, its my wife’s sisters birthday and she would be very disappointed if I wasn’t there, I am going to put you in the hands of my associate… do you mind?” WHAT THE FUCK do you want me to say? Where do you go from there? I had been in induced labor for 10 hours, 3 botched attempts at an epidural and now my OB that said he’d be there all the way through as I was high risk, was not going to see my delivery through? FINE. Go …

The surgeon that I did have was lovely, for someone that had been called in last minute and had literally just come from having his evening run. He cracked a few jokes, made the delivery and seconds later, I had this red slippery vulnerable thing on my chest. All I could think is you need to bond with this child this is the most important time. You need to breast feed right now. All I wanted to do was vomit and pass out. I just had my belly cut open and all my organs were pushed around which feel bloody terrible. Its not painful but I will never forget that feeling. The nurses ripped down my gown and latched the baby on to my breast.

(Mistake #2)

I don’t remember much for a few hours, but I remember being back in the room and having absolutely no idea what to do. I was pretty happy and success my baby was healthy. On day 3, I began to complain of an incredibly sore wound and I could hardly walk. I was sweating and became violently ill. My wound become infected, I had a super bug MRSA. I was transferred to Fremantle hospital isolation ward. My new baby and I, stuck in a cold room and everyone who came in had to wear top to toe infectious disease gear. I was isolated. My husband was in Mandurah, he came everyday but he also had to go home. This was not part of my plan… I had been pretty open to anything until this point, I wasn’t fussed how Daisy came into this world as long as she was okay. I didn’t care if I had to stay in hospital, but as long as I got to take her home.

I started spiralling into depression, They told me it was the baby blues and I needed to rest. They suggested that my husband take my daughter home. I was mortified, there was NO WAY anyone was taking my baby away from me. They told me I needed rest I refused and told them that I didn’t trust them. A nurse finally talked me into letting Daisy go into the baby ward for a night so I could sleep, I agreed and they let me sleep. After 2 gruelling weeks stuck in that shit hole, having blood tests, X-rays, endoscopies I was finally discharged.

I had a pic line and had to carry a bum bag of antibiotics with me 24/7 for another 2 weeks. I was home though, I had a whole 5 days left before my husband was due to go back to work. He was FIFO 4/1 so I was scared shitless what the hell was I going to do? The last 5 days, I couldn’t sit back and let my husband wait in me. He was doing everything and I had to learn how to do it. Because of the fact I was on such heavy antibiotics, I stopped breastfeeding. It was a huge decision, but the added pressure of it all was too much. Yes, I felt like a failure and yes I felt super guilty but I didn’t have time to dwell on it. I was now a single mum for the next 4 weeks. I remember how the air really chilled off as soon as I was alone.

A Revelation

Four years later, chilly April mornings still bring back the daunting feeling of being abandoned. The next few weeks, alone with my newborn, a daily visit from a nurse to change my Vank (Vancomycin) alone with my thoughts and the changing of season, was the perfect recipe for deep depression to slip in. I felt so alone, I felt so silly for feeling so alone. I felt like I was weak for feeling abandoned. You may think that my feelings of abandonment was from my husband going back to work?

No, they were from my doctor. The one who said he would be there through it all because I was high risk. The one who made me fill in mental health forms because I was a fifo partner and because I had a chronic auto immune disease. It was he who abandoned me. I thought of ways that I wanted to end his career. How was a dinner more important than my health or the health of my newborn? I set up a meeting. He apologised for what had happened. It wasn’t at all sufficient. But it woke me up. I realised, that there was not anyone that was going to make me feel better, but myself. I realised that my child (thank the universe) was 100% healthy and that I had to make sure that this child never ever felt abandoned or that she was a burden. It was hard, I never knew how hard being a parent could be. I was one of those women who thought that being a mum was an easy way out and a way to not work!

Yep. I was one of those. Well, there isn’t a man alive that I respect more than I do a mum. We do the best that we can with what we have with the absolute bear minimum, which is primal organic love. I could never have thought that I would be where I am now, with clear vision and goals, without have being a mother. Before being a mother, I was flippant and fickle. I swayed with the wind and was as shallow as a spill of milk. I may still be flippant and go with the flow, but there are things I will never do again and one thing I know I will never give up on and that is Daisy. Being her mother has taught me how to be patient, and to realise that things grown with time. I have also realised that the things you say today will not be forgotten tomorrow. I wish that I had some incredible thing to end with, but I don’t. I just want to say, the love that motherhood has given me is closely followed by the love I have got from fellow Mothers since.

Toni Gordon is a social media marketing & content creator. She started Left Coast Australia to showcase the best of the West Coasts people, places and products. If you would like your brand to stand out with video content that show the authentic you, get in touch.
Visit us: www.leftcoastaustralia.com
Or Email: Toni@LeftCoastAustralia.com